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Hire a Student

Career Development Center

How to hire a Mastodon.

Use this page as a resource so that you can learn everything you need to know about the hiring process for student employees.

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Know the Difference

There are two types of student employment—federal work-study (on and off campus) and non–work study (on campus). The primary difference between the two is how the positions are funded. 

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Federal Work-Study Employment

Work-study students must demonstrate financial need by filing the FAFSA. The federal government pays 70 percent of wages; the employing department pays 30 percent. Work-study students must meet minimum half-time enrollment requirements.
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Non–Work Study

Students don’t have to file the FAFSA for these types of jobs. The employing department pays 100 percent of wages. Non–work study student employees do not have an earnings limitation. Students must meet minimum time-enrollment requirements when working fall or spring semesters.

Hiring a Student

Get all the details.

Learn everything you need to about how to hire students for both work-study and non–work study jobs.

Here’s a little extra info regarding the Federal 
Work-Study Program:

  • Work-study students must demonstrate financial need by filing the FAFSA. 
  • The federal government pays 70 percent of wages; the employing department pays 30 percent. (America Reads tutors are funded 100 percent by the federal government.) 
  • Work-study earnings are not considered income when determining eligibility for financial aid the following year; wages are considered when calculating need-based financial aid for the following year. 
  • Only work-study-eligible students can work in work-study jobs. 
  • Work-study students have an earnings limit listed on the award letter. 
  • Work-study students must meet minimum half-time enrollment requirements. 
    • Six semester hours (undergraduates) 
    • Four semester hours (graduate students) 
    • Summer: same requirements

Here’s a little more info about hiring students for non–work study jobs: 

  • Filing the FAFSA is not required. 
  • The employing department pays 100 percent of wages. 
  • Non–work study employment earnings do not affect the current-year aid package. 
  • Any student can apply for non–work study employment jobs. 
  • Non–work study student employees do not have an earnings limitation; however, the number of hours worked may be limited by the department’s funding. 
  • Students must meet minimum time-enrollment requirements when working fall or spring semesters; during summer sessions, enrollment is not required if the student was enrolled at least half-time during the previous spring semester and there is evidence of planned (at least half-time) enrollment for the fall semester immediately following.

Here are the steps for on-campus departments to hire a Purdue Fort Wayne student: 

  1. Create a job description that includes student learning outcomes using the Career Readiness Competencies.
  2. Create a Handshake account (if you don’t already have one). 
  3. Post your student employee positions on Handshake. Make sure that you select “Work-Study” as the position type.
  4. Once approved, the job will be live on Handshake and students will then have the opportunity to search and apply for your position. 
  5. Review student documents and decide which students you would like to interview. 
  6. Interview selected students. 
  7. Make the job offer. When you are ready to hire, all positions classified as work-study need the Work-Study Authorization Form.  
  8. Once you have made an employment offer, you must also fill out this short survey
  9. Have your student employee participate in Student Employment Training.

Here are the steps you need to take to hire a student employee: 

  1. Fill out the Federal Work-Study Needs Assessment and the Federal Work Study Off-Campus Contract. Send these documents to the Office of Career Development Center at [email protected]. These documents will be reviewed to see if your organization meets the requirements for the Federal Work-Study Program. 
  2. The Career Development Center will contact you and inform you if your organization is approved. 
  3. Once your organization is approved, you will create a Handshake account (if you don’t have one). 
  4. Create a job posting on Handshake. Make sure that you label the type of job as work-study. 
  5. Once the job description is approved, the job will be live on Handshake. 
  6. Review student résumés and interview the students of your choice. 
  7. Make the job offer. You must also fill out this short survey
  8. Complete the Federal Work-Study Authorization Form
  9. Lastly, review the responsibilities of the employer and encourage your new student worker to register for Student Employment Training.

For more information, contact Human Resources and Office of Institutional Equity.

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Training

Successful student employees require successful leaders.

If you’re interested in hiring a student employee, we have resources to assist you. To help them—and you—achieve success, we also provide support through student employment training, supervisor training, and professionalism coaching.

FAQ

Find the answers you need.

Have a question? You may find the answer right here. Check below, and if you still can’t find what you’re looking for, reach out to us.

On-campus offices and off-campus nonprofit agencies that have no religious affiliation (unless the work is clerical or janitorial in nature) may utilize work-study students.

Usually the organization pays the student 25 percent of the total amount of work-study money that the student is awarded through financial aid, while the federal government pays the remaining 75 percent. This is not paid all at once to the student, but rather in standard employee paychecks. If the organization is a nonprofit that deals specifically with literacy issues, it may qualify to have the federal government pay 100 percent of the student’s wages.

Work-study students typically work 10–15 hours per week. However, they can work as many as they want, until their 
work-study money runs out.

The student will know if they have received work-study money from their award letter from the Office of Financial Aid. If the student is unsure, they should check with financial aid.

Complete the Federal Work-Study Authorization Form and provide a copy with a Cognos report or applicable Banner Screens attached to payroll. Be sure to ask whether your student worker will be using their award in more than one department, and work with that department to determine if the student’s award can be shared with your department. There is a place to indicate this on the form.

Contact Us

Have questions?

 

Contact the Career Development Center at [email protected] or 260-481-0689.